Program Overview:

The Department of Philosophy at Koç University produces world-class research, scholarship, and instruction in philosophy and its history. Our graduate program offers a wide range of courses and expert supervision in several specializations, aimed at providing students with the skills necessary for advanced research in philosophy and for pursuing doctoral or professional work at leading international institutions.

Our two-year MA program accepts talented students from diverse academic backgrounds, including different levels of prior experience in philosophy. Students receive training in several core philosophical fields, as well as guidance in the production of a high-quality, original masters thesis in a chosen specialization. Additionally, the Department offers interdisciplinary training in two of its principal strengths through two certificate programs, the Certificate in Ancient Philosophy and the Certificate in Mind & Language.

Program Outcomes:

PO1 students are versed in the major subdisciplines of philosophy such as Ontology, Metaphysics, Epistemology, Philosophy of Mind, Philosophy of Language, Logic, Ethics, Social and Political Philosophy, Aesthetics

PO2 students are acquainted with History of Philosophy (Ancient, Modern, Philosophy in the Middle Ages and Renaissance, History of Early Analytic Philosophy.)

PO3 students have the ability to reason clearly, coherently, and logically

PO4 students are acquainted with methods of moral reasoning and are familiar with the sound principles of action.

PO5 students have a variety of area elective courses such as political philosophy, contemporary political theory, philosophy of mind, philosophy of language, philosophy of action, human rights and philosophy, philosophical perspectives on gender in their areas of interest and which have connections to other disciplines

PO6 students achieve creativity in doing philosophy and gain self-confidence on the way to publishing their work with the support of the faculty

PO7 students are prepared for graduate studies

PO8 students learn actively and take the initiative to organize seminars and talks in undergraduate philosophy club.

Occupational Profiles of Graduates:

University, secondary education, media, public relation, press, charitable foundation, sivil society are some of institutions which be able to work philosophy graduates.

Courses:

 

PHIL 501 / GRADUATE SEMINAR In this seminar students in their first year will cover a variety of topics designed to introduce the practical and theoretical skills necessary for graduate-level philosophy.
PHIL 590 / THESIS SEMINAR In this seminar students in the second year present work relevant to their thesis research.
PHIL 451.02/551.02  VIRTUE, JUSTICE, AND THE GOOD IN THE ANCIENT WORLD* An advanced study of a topic in ancient ethical or political philosophy, broadly construed. Topics to focus on a figure or school, a question or theme, or a relevant text. Emphasis on critical engagement with current scholarly debates on the chosen topic.

 

PHIL 451.01/551.01 MIND AND REALITY IN THE ANCIENT WORLD* An advanced study of a topic in ancient Greek and Roman philosophy, emphasizing issues related to metaphysics, epistemology, and theoretical approaches to phenomena we would call “mental”. Topics might focus on a particular figure or school (e.g. Plato’s theory of Forms, Stoic epistemology), a general question or theme (e.g. ancient skepticism), or a relevant text (e.g. Aristotle’s Metaphysics); but in every case students will engage with contemporary scholarship on the chosen topic as well as recent work on related philosophical problems.
PHIL 450 / FALLIBILISM, CERTAINTY, AND DOGMATISM Discussion of epistemic and ethical questions concerning fallibilism; whether certainty is a condition for knowledge, whether claims to knowledge is always a dogmatic attitude, how to be open-minded without being a skeptic.
PHIL 404/504 PHILOSOPHY OF CURIOSITY* Discussion of historical, epistemic, semantic, and ethical questions related to the notion of curiosity; defining curiosity; its historical background; how curiosity relates to awareness of ignorance, Meno’s Paradox, asking questions, knowledge, belief, acquaintance, understanding, truth and epistemic virtues.
PHIL 455/555 METAPHYSICS OF SCIENCE Discussion of the relationship between metaphysics and empirical sciences; specific metaphysical issues arising from scientific theories; for example, metaphysics of time in relativity; metaphysics of fundamental entities in quantum mechanics; metaphysics of kinds in biology.

Course & Program Outcomes Matrix:

 

Courses PO1 PO2 PO3 PO4 PO5 PO6 PO7 PO8
PHIL 501 / GRADUATE SEMINAR  x  x  x  x  x
PHIL 590 / THESIS SEMINAR  x  x  x  x
PHIL 451.02/551.02  VIRTUE, JUSTICE, AND THE GOOD IN THE ANCIENT WORLD*  x  x  x  x  x
PHIL 451.01/551.01 MIND AND REALITY IN THE ANCIENT WORLD*  x  x  x  x
PHIL 450 / FALLIBILISM, CERTAINTY, AND DOGMATISM  x  x  x
PHIL 404/504 PHILOSOPHY OF CURIOSITY*  x  x  x
PHIL 4XX/5XX METAPHYSICS OF SCIENCE

 

x x x

 

 

Note: These are selections from some of the classes offered recently, and new courses are designed and offered every year.